hero time is gone
pomgraphicdesign:

Sea Waves Pattern Wood Print by Pom Graphic Design

pomgraphicdesign:

Sea Waves Pattern Wood Print by Pom Graphic Design

yarnsters:

Mermaid Tails

yarnsters:

Mermaid Tails

textiledreams:

Siri Rustebakke, center, sits in front of a house with her daughters and daughter-in-law and four spinning wheels.

textiledreams:

Siri Rustebakke, center, sits in front of a house with her daughters and daughter-in-law and four spinning wheels.

indypendenthistory:

Welsh Woman Spinning, circa 1885

indypendenthistory:

Welsh Woman Spinning, circa 1885

professionalbotherer:

Going to try my first true 3-ply #handspun #yarn #kromski

professionalbotherer:

Going to try my first true 3-ply #handspun #yarn #kromski

everydaypeacocks:

Gorgeous spinning wheel… one-of-these-days to-do list
(via Golding Fiber Tools - Triple Flyer Model)

everydaypeacocks:

Gorgeous spinning wheel… one-of-these-days to-do list

(via Golding Fiber Tools - Triple Flyer Model)

gilmoure:

All things dull and ugly
All creatures short and squat
All things rude and nasty
The Lord God made the lot

Each little snake that poisons
Each little wasp that stings
He made their brutish venom
He made their horrid wings

All things sick and cancerous
All evil great and small
All things…

On this day in 1831 Darwin landed in the Galapagos, where he was met by Satan and given a plan to trick biology students into going to Hell.
(via teapartycat)
rhamphotheca:

Bird Droppings Led to U.S. Possession of Newly Protected Pacific Islands
A 19th-century quest for natural fertilizer, bird guano, led to the world’s largest marine reserve.
by Dan Vergano
Blame it on “guano mania.” A craze for natural fertilizer made from bird droppings spurred the U.S. to take possession of a group of remote Pacific islands in the 19th century, and now those islands are home to the world’s largest marine reserve.
On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced an expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument to cover nearly 490,000 square miles, six times larger than its previous size.
(See “U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California.”)
The Guano Islands Act of 1856 made it possible. The United States long ago used the act to claim islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean as territory, which means that today the U.S. government has the legal authority to protect waters up to 200 miles out from each island, an area known as the exclusive economic zone…
(read more: National Geographic)
photograph: Tui De Roi/National Geographic

rhamphotheca:

Bird Droppings Led to U.S. Possession of Newly Protected Pacific Islands

A 19th-century quest for natural fertilizer, bird guano, led to the world’s largest marine reserve.

by Dan Vergano

Blame it on “guano mania.” A craze for natural fertilizer made from bird droppings spurred the U.S. to take possession of a group of remote Pacific islands in the 19th century, and now those islands are home to the world’s largest marine reserve.

On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced an expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument to cover nearly 490,000 square miles, six times larger than its previous size.

(See “U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California.”)

The Guano Islands Act of 1856 made it possible. The United States long ago used the act to claim islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean as territory, which means that today the U.S. government has the legal authority to protect waters up to 200 miles out from each island, an area known as the exclusive economic zone…

(read more: National Geographic)

photograph: Tui De Roi/National Geographic

WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?

Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.

Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.

…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.

lunabudknits:

Finishing up a quick rug/felting yarn the on to mohair! #wool #spinning #handspun #handspinning #targhee

lunabudknits:

Finishing up a quick rug/felting yarn the on to mohair! #wool #spinning #handspun #handspinning #targhee